Natural Remedies For Over 200 Illnesses

Indigestion

Overview

Indigestion commonly referred to as an upset stomach and also known as dyspepsia. Dyspepsia, describes pain or discomfort in the stomach and chest that is usually experienced soon after eating or drinking.

The symptoms of indigestion are often described as ‘heartburn’, which you may experience as a burning pain behind your breastbone (sternum). Heartburn is caused by acid that passes from your stomach into your oesophagus (gullet).

If you have indigestion, you may also have symptoms such as:

  • feeling uncomfortably full or heavy
  • belching (burping)
  • regurgitation (where food comes back up from your stomach)
  • bloating
  • nausea (feeling sick)
  • vomiting (being sick)

Serious symptoms:

In some cases, indigestion can be a sign of a more serious underlying health problem, such as stomach cancer. Seek immediate medical attention if you have recurring indigestion and you:

  • are 55 years old or over
  • have lost a lot of weight without meaning to
  • have increasing difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)
  • have persistent vomiting
  • have iron deficiency anaemia, a reduction in the number of red blood cells because the body does not contain enough iron to produce them (which causes tiredness, breathlessness and an irregular heartbeat)
  • have a lump in your stomach
  • have gastrointestinal bleeding, which is bleeding in your stomach and intestines (you may have blood in your vomit or stools and you may feel tired, breathless and dizzy)

Indigestion (dyspepsia) occurs when acid from your stomach irritates the lining of your stomach, oesophagus (gullet) and top part of your bowel.

In most cases, there is no underlying medical reason for indigestion. It is usually caused by a process known as acid reflux, where acid from your stomach escapes and is forced back up into your oesophagus.

However, indigestion can also be caused in other ways, and it can sometimes be a symptom of an underlying medical condition, particularly if you experience recurrent bouts. Possible causes are:

Medications

Some medicines, such as nitrates (taken to widen your blood vessels) relax the oesophageal sphincter (ring of muscle between your oesophagus and your stomach), which allows acid to leak back up.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), can affect your digestive tract and cause indigestion. These include aspirin and ibuprofen. We recommend you consult your licensed health practitioner before stopping any prescribed medication.

Obesity

If you are very overweight, you are more likely to experience indigestion because of increased pressure inside your abdomen which canforce open your oesophageal sphincter after a large meal, causing acid reflux.

Hiatus hernia

A hernia occurs when an internal part of the body, such as an organ, pushes through a weakness in the surrounding muscle or tissue wall.

A hiatus hernia occurs when part of your stomach pushes up into your diaphragm (the sheet of muscle under your lungs), preventing your oesophageal sphincter from closing. This can allow stomach acid to travel back up into your oesophagus, leading to heartburn.

Helicobacter pylori infection

You may have recurring bouts of indigestion if you have an infection with Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) bacteria. H pylori infections are common, and it is possible to become infected without realising because the infection does not usually cause any symptoms.

However, in some cases an H pylori infection can damage your stomach lining and increase the amount of acid in your stomach. It is also possible for your duodenum (the top of your small intestine) to be irritated by excess stomach acid if you have an H pylori infection.

Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD)

This is a common condition and one of the main causes of recurring indigestion. It is caused by acid reflux. This occurs when the oesophageal sphincter fails to prevent stomach acid from moving back up into your oesophagus. Acid reflux becomes GORD when the sensitive lining of your oesophagus is damaged by repeated irritation from stomach acid.

Peptic ulcers

This is an open sore that develops on the inside lining of your stomach (a gastric ulcer) or small intestine (a duodenal ulcer). If you have a peptic ulcer, you may have indigestion as a symptom. Peptic ulcers form when stomach acid damages the lining in your stomach or duodenum wall. In most peptic ulcer cases, the lining is damaged as a result of an H pylori infection (see above).

Stomach cancer

In rare cases, recurrent bouts of indigestion can be a symptom of stomach cancer.

Cancer cells in your stomach break down the protective lining, allowing acid to come into contact with your stomach wall.

Stress – This is a major cause of indigestion

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If you do the Jeff McCombs Candida Protocol you will already be avoiding all of the foods that trigger Acne.  However here are the foods to avoid at all costs.

  • Do not consume any artificial sweeteners, such as Splenda, NutraSweet or Aspartame
  • Do not consume high fructose corn syrup or mono-sodium glutamate.
  • Do not drink any carbonated beverages.
  • Avoid all fast food restaurants.
  • Avoid all canned food.
  • Eliminate conventional dairy products. The best dairy products are raw, unpasteurised and homogenised dairy from grass fed cows.  If this is unavailable, then buy organic dairy.
  • Avoid conventional beef.  The best beef is organic grass fed beef.

www.grasslandbeef.com  The second best is organic meat; this includes beef, veal, lamb, chicken and turkey.

To avoid indigestion, eat small portions of food at regular intervals and avoid rushing meals. Avoid fried, fatty and spicy foods. Eliminate all commercially processed foods, spicy foods, sugars, refined carbohydrates, unhealthy fats, coffee and other caffeine products, chocolate, sodas, commercial non-herbal teas, alcohol, orange and grapefruit juice, tomato products, milk and dairy products, and foods containing peppermint and spearmint. Also have yourself screened for potential food allergies and sensitivities and avoid those foods for which you test positive.

Instead emphasize a diet rich in organic whole foods, especially organic fresh green vegetables and green vegetable drinks. Free-range organic meats and poultry, and wild-caught fish are also recommended. In addition, be sure to drink plenty of pure filtered water throughout the day.

Avoid overeating and eating meals late in the evening. As a general rule of thumb, in order to prevent and reverse heartburn symptoms, eat meals that are predominantly alkalizing in nature, especially green vegetables. (For more information about how to eat alkalizing foods, see pH.) Meals should ideally consist of generous portions of fresh leafy green salads, bare or lightly dressed, with an equally generous portion of lightly steamed vegetables and a fist sized portion of steamed, baked, broiled or carefully grilled protein. Organically produced foods, and carefully chosen oils, such as raw virgin coconut butter/oil, extra virgin olive oil and high lignan flax seed oil are your safest options. Avoid all fried foods, and all hydrogenated fats and oils. Choose raw, rather than roasted nuts and seeds, both in whole and butter form. Raw almond butter is a better option than peanut butter, and is a great snack when spread on apple slices.

Foods that can often quickly resolve heartburn problems are apples, raw cucumbers (peeled), brown rice, and walnuts. Sipping a glass of pure, filtered water with a couple of teaspoons of raw organic apple cider vinegar or baking soda (one teaspoon to eight ounces of water) can also quickly neutralize heartburn attacks.

Supplements:

Digestive enzymes (taken with every meal) – www.qnhshop.com

  • Fivelac one pack three times a day.
  • Take Vitamin D3 50,000-100,000 International Units a day
  • Wholefood supplements are the best way of ensuring your nutritional needs are met.  The best we know on the market is Kevin Trudeau’s “KT Daily” product.  You can find more details here.
  • Raw organic apple cider vinegar – 1 tablespoon with every meal
  • Able Heel
  • Deer Antler Velvet
  • Coral Calcium
  • Intravenous Chelation
  • Omega 3s

Krill oil

Fish oil

Cod liver oil

Vegetarian

The most useful nutritional supplements for treating and preventing heartburn are digestive enzymes (taken with every meal) and calcium carbonate (take 600 mg in liquid or chewable form every two to three hours until symptoms subside).

Probiotics such as acidophilus and Bifidobacteria, can also be helpful, as can fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) and soil-based organisms. FOS is an all-natural carbohydrate microorganism that has been shown by researchers to serve as a fertilizing agent that enables Bifidobacteria to thrive in the large intestine, where it helps to protect against harmful bacteria.

Soil-based organisms are beneficial microbes found in soil. Taken as a supplement, they go to work to detoxify the gastrointestinal tract while eliminating fungi, molds, parasites, viruses, and yeasts. They also help to improve absorption of nutrients and boost both immune and overall cell function, including the production of RNA and DNA. In addition, they act as natural antioxidants

Prescription and non-prescription medication:

What non-prescription and prescription drugs are you taking?  Your non-prescription and prescription are partially the reason that you have this illness or disease – you need to get off these medications but do so only under the guidance of a licensed health care practitioner.

We know that when the body is out of balance, energy doesn’t flow, leading blockages and eventually disease. Here are some things you can do to combat stress and restore balance:

  • Go to a Dr Morter BEST (Bio-Energetic Synchronisation Technique) Practitioner.
  • Sign up for Energetic Re-Balancing: 2 practitioners to consider are:

Stephen Lewis, founder of the Aim Program. Find out more by clicking here.

. Find out more by clicking here.

  • Reiki healing is very powerful in releasing stress and emotional baggage.  Find a practitioner here.
  • Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) has had remarkable results in dissolving stress.  Find a local practitioner here or go to www.thetappingsolution.com or www.tftrx.com
  • Try Hypnotherapy to relax the mind.  Find a practitioner here.
  •  Alphabiotics
  • Meditation is another form of stress management that can be highly effective. There are many ways to meditate. One of the easiest is simply to sit comfortably in a chair with your eyes closed as you focus on your breathing. Do this for five to ten minutes twice a day and gradually extend each session to 20 to 30 minutes. To enhance your efforts, concentrate on mentally repeating a peaceful phrase each time that you inhale and exhale, allowing all other thoughts to rise and pass without becoming involved in them. At first, this may seem difficult, but with committed practice you will eventually find yourself able to do so while experiencing greater degrees of calm and peace.
This section is for members only. To access it, please click here and register today.

Zinc and indigestion: www.livestrong.com/article/417871-new-research-done-on-zinc-for-acid-reflux

Natural remedies for Indigestion: www.naturalnews.com/032156_bloating_natural_remedies.html

Video

Ayurvedic treatment for indigestion:  www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYUsx55L7Zc

Home Remedy for Indigestion: www.youtube.com/watch?v=toWNEQuvIi4

Research

Acupuncture stops indigestion: www.healthcmi.com/index.php/acupuncturist-news-online/488-acupunctureceusstopsindigestion

Taking indigestion medication may increase risk of osteoporosis: www.naturalnews.com/025369_risk_drugs_drugs.html

Heartburn medications do more harm than good: www.naturalnews.com/019756_heartburn_antacids.html

Further Information (links and books)

Gastrointestinal Health, Steven Perkin MD; Eating Right For A Bad Gut, James Scala

Andrea Butje | Aromahead andrea@aromahead.com – aromatherapy

Carrie Vitt deliciouslyorganic@yahoo.com – organic food recipes.

David Spector-NSR/USA david024@nsrusa.org – meditation, stress

Judith Hoad judithhoad@gmail.com – herbalist.

Kath May kathrynmay@talktalk.net – reiki, tai chi.

Lillian Bridges lillian@lotusinstitute.com – Chinese medicine, living naturally.

Monika monika@healingmuse.com – aromatherapy.

Rakesh  GAC@AyurvedicLifeStyles.com – Ayurvedic Practitioner.

Joanne Callaghan – joanne@tftrx.com   www.RogerCallahan.com Thought Field Therapy (TF) releasing unresolved emotions, stress and illness.

Trusted products

  • Raw Organic Apple Cider Vinegar. This fights bacteria, detoxifies and encourages healthy digestion. To prevent acid reflux and subsequent heartburn, take 1 tbsp. of raw apple cider vinegar before each meal.
  • Digestive Enzymes www.throppsnutrition.com
  • Acid Reducer, Acid Reflux www.herbsmd.com
  • Probiotics Jarrowdophilius + FOS www.jarrow.com
  • Viable Herbal Solutions, Botanical SafeGuard www.herbal-solutions.com
  • Unrefined, Organic, Virgin Coconut Oil – take one tablespoon in the morning and one tablespoon in the late afternoon.
  • Cinnamon  and Ginger  – cinnamon is another natural remedy for digestive problems. It works in part by reducing stomach acid, but it also has antibiotic and antifungal properties which facilitate digestion. Other folk traditions rely on ginger for acid reflux since it helps calm stomach acid and relax the muscles of the oesophagus. Try sipping a tea made with fresh ginger root and a pinch of cinnamon as a restful way to relieve symptoms. Alternatively enjoy an interesting Korean remedy made from cinnamon sticks, fresh ginger root, sugar and dried persimmons.
  • Licorice –  Licorice, or Glycyrrhiza glabra, is a legume and member of the Fabaceae, or pea family. It has been used for over 3,000 years to treat a variety of ailments. Currently, medical studies support the use of licorice for the treatment of inflamed intestinal tissues
  • Chamomile Tea
  • KT Daily Supplements